September 2012

2012 SWEDEN 1hr 24min Doc/Bio/Music PG-13

Searching for Sugar Man

Searching for Sugar Man tells the incredible true story of Rodriguez, the greatest ’70s rock icon who never was. Discovered in a Detroit bar in the late ’60s by two celebrated producers struck by his soulful melodies and prophetic lyrics, they recorded an album which they believed would secure his reputation as the greatest recording artist of his generation. In fact, the album bombed and the singer disappeared into obscurity amid rumors of a gruesome on-stage suicide. But a bootleg recording found its way into apartheid South Africa and, over the next two decades, he became a phenomenon.


2012 FRANCE 1hr  47min Drama/Romance Not Rated

The Well-Digger's Daughter

Eponymous well-digger, Pascale, is a widower living with his six daughters in the Provence countryside at the start of World War I. His eldest, Patricia, has returned home from Paris to help raise her sisters, and Pascale dreams of marrying her off to his loyal assistant Felipe. But when she’s impregnated by a wealthy young pilot who promptly abandons her for the frontlines, Pascale is left to contend with the consequences.  Written and directed by Daniel Auteuil, based on the work by Marcel Pagnol.


2012 USA 1hr 31min Documentary Rated R

Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry

Alison Klayman’s AI WEIWEI: NEVER SORRY is a fascinating up-close look at renowned Chinese artist and dissident Ai Weiwei and his ongoing battle with the Chinese government. Named by ArtReview as the most powerful artist in the world, Ai Weiwei is China’s most celebrated contemporary artist, and its most outspoken domestic critic. In April 2011, when Ai disappeared into police custody for three months he quickly became China’s most famous missing person, having first risen to international prominence in 2008 after helping design Beijing’s iconic Bird’s Nest Olympic Stadium—and then publicly denouncing the Games as party propaganda. Since then, Ai Weiwei’s critiques of China’s repressive regime have ranged from playful photographs of his raised middle finger in front of Tiananmen Square to searing memorials to the more than 5,000 schoolchildren who died in shoddy government construction in the 2008 Sichuan earthquake. Against a backdrop of strict censorship, Ai has become a kind of internet champion, using his blog and constant—and frequently witty—Twitter stream to organize, inform and inspire his followers, becoming an underground hero to millions of Chinese citizens.